by Ed Naile

With the realization that many of our state and national elections have been determined by pre-programed ballot counting machine voter fraud, people who now want to get involved need a basic set of documents for research.

Voter fraud is in the burner now. New activists need only follow the news. Elected officials in some states violated their state constitutions to control election results.

Government education funding lawsuits are just as unconstitutional and always just around the corner with a new set of plaintiffs.

I heartily suggest reading up on this next “crisis” our courts in NH would love to continue imposing on us – the strange progressive obsession that money alone can solve what is wrong with failing government schools.

Below is a simple 9 page, much of which is annotation, publication regarding education funding disparities.

There are many others like it.

Read this and you will understand more about court-imposed education funding than our governor and almost everyone in the legislature.

The Finance Paradox: How American Constitutional Values_ Inhibit the Funding of Quality Education

Here are some examples of what you will find:

“Abstract: In America, free public education is a constitutional value. Yet, although free public education for all is a constitutional value, America’s public schools remain ravaged by “savage inequalities” many of which are the direct result of significant financial disparities among the public schools. Given the obvious conflict between the constitutional value of free public education for all and the funding parities created by the States’ school finance systems, it is not surprising that the courts have been asked to intervene and vindicate the constitutional value of free public education for all by declaring that the current system of financing the schools is unconstitutional.”

Notice the term “value” regarding our free education – not a “right.” Even proponents of no limit spending concede the difference.

Here is another jewel from the article:

“Given the obvious conflict between the constitutional value of free public education and the funding disparities created by the school finance systems, it is not surprising that the courts have been asked to intervene and vindicate the constitutional value of free public education by declaring that the current system of financing the schools is unconstitutional.”

It is not surprising that the courts, meaning state courts because the US Supreme Court rejected that education funding scheme through the US Constitution, San Antonio Independent School District v. Rodriguez 1973.

Judicial Restraint:

“Judicial review – the ability of the courts to invalidate a law because it is contrary to the state and/or federal Constitutions – is the power to nullify the results of the democratic process. The elected members of the legislature, thinking that they are acting in accordance with the federal and State Constitutions, pass a law that has the overwhelming support of the people. The elected executive, thinking that the bill presented is constitutional, signs the proposal into law. Yet despite the measure’s popularity and despite the fact that the elected legislature and the elected executive think that the new statute is both wise policy and constitutional, the judiciary, which is the least democratic branch, invalidates the law simply because it interprets the state and/or federal constitutions differently. Thus, the will of the people, as expressed through their elected leaders, is thwarted by a simple majority of judges.”

This article is by a proponent of endless lawsuits to funnel limitless amounts of money to government schools, not private schools, mind you. That, I imagine, would be “unconstitutional” if you asked him.

Please make yourself as informed about our unconstitutional “Claremont Decisions” as you are now by watching systemic voter fraud being exposed.

You will not regret knowing the basics when the Claremont “crisis” rears its ugly head again.

Like Project Veritas founder James O’Keefe says: “Be brave, do something.”
What could be simpler than being informed?