Sometimes you trust and rely on the mainstream media and their “journalists” to print the story. But it is never without a slant.

Lately, it seems that we live in a bizarro upside-down world where wrong is right, down is up, and bad is good.

Witness the UL’s coverage given to CNHT’s annual event which featured whistleblower and crime fighter James O’Keefe of Project Veritas.

James has been working on exposing a variety of issues related to government corruption, not the least of which is the voter and election fraud that seems to have taken place in NH with votes cast by non-residents with improper domiciles, individuals who engaged in double voting, or illegal participation of foreign parties in US campaigns.

For example, O’Keefe produced a series of videos on how easily one could fake an identity, taking names from recent obituaries in order to procure a ballot. Although he demonstrated how this could be done, but never intended to vote or even actually took a ballot, he was accused by the NH AG of a crime, with an immediate attempt to arrest him upon his return to NH.

Somehow, this backward behavior on the part of NH’s election officials seems to be reinforced and encouraged by the press (i.e. arrest the whistle blower and ignore the perpetrators).

In addition to hearing nothing about the fact that members of the Australian Labor Party were clearly engaging in paid election work in the US, which is illegal, reporter Mike Cousineau wrote “Assistant Attorney General Brian Buonamano last week said he recently inherited the O’Keefe case and that it remains an active investigation. “It’s currently under my review,” he said.

Is the UL referring to an investigation of the impropriety of the Australian Labor Party working in a US election and the fake domiciles, or, are they talking about a continued attempt to investigate O’Keefe himself? It almost suggests the latter, and we’ve contacted the reporter for clarification.

Further, it was reported that “In 2013, O’Keefe agreed to pay $100,000 to a former employee of ACORN to settle a lawsuit for being secretly interviewed in 2009, according to Politico. The videos O’Keefe made led to the collapse of ACORN, which helped register voters and organize campaigns in low-income areas, Politico said. Keefe was accused of unfairly editing the videos.”

Seems that officials were more concerned with whether O’Keefe had the right to tape someone (expectation of privacy rule) rather than the fact that ACORN had committed fraud in the way they were registering voters, or that ACORN was forced to shut down and change its name.

As far as we know, the only editing that is done is when clips are shortened for getting to the meat of the matter, but never has there been an attempt to alter the raw facts seen in the video, which are damning enough alone. Longer versions are always available.

It is not surprising that the UL quotes comments from two members of academia, including Jeff Sharlet who writes for “GQ” which is a men’s fashion magazine. (GQ’s self description is “The definitive men’s magazine, with style advice and tips, sexy women, entertainment and culture news, interviews, and more.”) Sharlet suggested that citizen journalists are not good at “working sources and contextualization”, which might suggest he thinks that these videos are lacking in facts or do not speak for themselves. But the comment from Rep. David Bates, R-Windham suggests that legislators have the problem of election fraud in NH under control.

The sad fact is, they do not.